Wrapped

I hung sixty metres of silver polyester fabric and covered a floor with fluoro sticky paper  to create an installation in a small enclosed space as a trial for studio practice.

wrapped
wrapped

I am interested in corrupting spatial boundaries , exploring materiality and finding a use for discarded fabrics or commercially unviable materials. 

Projection
Projection

I also use films I have made to create projections onto the surface of the materials to explore and develop an investigation of colour and light.

Installation
Installation

Orange Rain

I completed studio practice in 2018 with a performance of 3600 pieces of hand cut orange tracing paper falling in the internal stairwell of Building D at Monash University , Caulfield.

Overhead view of the completed performance piece Orange Rain by dhonan
Overhead view of the completed performance piece Orange Rain by dhonan

It signified the amount of time I had spent working on studio practice whilst completing my Bachelor of Fine Art Degree.

The paper was placed in four black buckets and flung from various elevation points within the space.

stairwell with orange rain debris
stairwell with orange rain debris

It was a joyous, embracive  and exhilarating work celebrating the support I had received, and the strength through knowledge I now have to embark on my own artistic journey.

Orange Rain
Orange Rain

 

The Vault aka The Yellow Peril

Small Sculptural Maquette
Small Sculptural Maquette

I chanced upon an artist talk on a cold wet saturday in Melbourne,  by sculptor Ron Robertson-Swann at Charles Nodrum Gallery in Richmond.

Ron Robertson-Swann
Ron Robertson-Swann

 

 

This unassuming, diminutive man produced the infamous large sculpture “The Vault ” or as it was famously labelled  ” The Yellow Peril”.

 

 

found objects
found objects

The piece was a winner of a competition staged by the Melbourne City Council who were looking for a distinctive signature piece for City Square. It won and was  installed in May 1980 , just prior to the then State Government sacking the Melbourne City Council.

The work , initially called ” The Thing ” by Roberston-Swann and “Steelhenge ” by the workers who made it , was critically labelled  ” The Yellow Peril ” by newspapers of the day . In September 1980 Robertson-Swann called the work  ” The Vault ” but to many the work has remained known as ” The Yellow Peril ”

Small Sculptural Maquette
Small Sculptural Maquette

In 1981, the Vault was re-erected at Batman Park, a less prominent part of the city. At the time Robertson-Swann was interviewed about its relocation which he described as it being placed in a wasteground of a holding yard for the railways. It remained there until 2002 when it was moved to a position outside the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art in Southbank.

In 2017, the sculpture was recommended for heritage protection, through inclusion in the City of Melbourne Planning Scheme Heritage Overlay, following a heritage study of the Southbank Area.

 

“The Vault” has been inspirational for some built and propositional architectural projects designed in Melbourne. Several of Denton Corker Marshall‘s works have “adopted peril’s yellow almost as a point of pride and solidarity” while its form has been manipulated in some works by ARM Architecture (Ashton Raggatt McDougall).

Maquette for the Vault
Maquette for the Vault

I took much away from the artists talk. It gave me an opportunity to view the works of his expansive practice  and realise that no one piece defines or contains a creative practice. Also that once a piece is sold the creator loses control of the piece and its new placement which can challenge the artists integrity . Also it may be preferable to give work a title to avoid the labelling of the work by an uncomplimentary tag.

 

Maquette for the Vault
Maquette for the Vault

A prolific worker, sculptor and Head of Sculpture at the National School of Art, Ron Robertson-Swann is thriving and living proof that artists just keep working.

Beware of Falling

floor scene " fear of falling"
floor scene ” fear of falling”

“Beware of Falling” is the title of my final performance piece of my second year Bachelor Of Fine Art. It concluded my 2017 study year at Monash University, Melbourne.

The formative work began as a response to a studio project entitled ” A Narrative Tale”. Initially I decided to  photograph my wardrobe. This took some time and involved the photographing of four hundred and two items of clothing. All my clothes are sourced from flea markets, vintage sales, opportunity or charity shops, garage sales and online second hand sites. I habitually buy only second hand items. This is a personal habit formed over many  years. Financial circumstances made recycling an initial lifestyle choice.   As a visual artist I employ an ongoing aesthetic of repurposing the found object . This combined with my love of the old, quirky and undervalued has continued to inform my purchasing choices. As a weekly volunteer at a local op shop and keen sewer I have great resources and the ability to refashion rehoused items.

close up of refashioned fabric
close up of refashioned fabric

A thirteen hour photo shot started the process which took on many iterations over the course of the 2017 year. Photographic displays, artist books, diagrams and sculptural pieces, drawings and collages extended the theme. Further work included using large quantities of fabric to create installation pieces, which were hand dyed, silk screened, torn, stiffened or embellished in some manner,  all bearing the hand of the artist. I played with fifty metres, twenty metres and ten metres of fabric in various configurations in the stairwell at Monash University Building D. It rapidly became my work space, informed my methodology and forced me to address questions of scale and spatial practice.

refashioning fabric
refashioning fabric

My final iteration of the work took the form of a performance piece at the end of year show. I recruited several helpers who were to  drop their specific bag of colour coded fabric into the stairwell onto the swathe of a sixty metre piece of orange fabric hung there . It  was a total of four hundred and two pieces of fabric to replicate the original four hundred and two pieces of my wardrobe.

A film was made.

The overall process involved a huge amount of physical labour, manual manipulation and lengthy thought process. It involved a prodigious following through of the original concept . Much collaboration was required, reliance on participants labour and skills. Uncertain as to the outcome it addressed my interest in public performance, trained me to address spatial concepts and fed my imagination. Never satisfied or appeased my restless search in my practice is continuing. What do  viewers take away from a performance? How is the non static  judged?  How important is it to leave or maintain a permanent record of work.

 

Intermission Gallery at Monash University

Last week  I collaborated in a Group Show at Intermission Gallery on the Caulfield Campus at Monash University . It is a new ground floor gallery space in the recently renovated D Building which is part of the MADA, Monash Art Design and Architecture School.

My piece ” Dress ” was a Wedding Dress found in an Op Shop several years ago. I deconstructed the dress and treated it with a chemical stiffener laundry product sourced after much trial and error and experimentation with various products.

Dress
Dress

It addresses a narrative tale based on the discovery  of my mother’s 1950’s wedding dress I found hidden in a cupboard after my mothers demise to dementia. The dress was in a rather dishevelled state replicating my mothers frail and unravelling health of her later years.

 

As a homage to this memory  I recreated a rather visceral, evocative piece. Her original wedding dress remains in my safe keeping, one of the few tangible possessions I have of my mum and something I will perhaps gift to my three daughters.

 

Sap Ball
Sap Ball

The work was hung in a small, seperate room of the gallery, strung by wire from the complicated pipe system overhead. Six small beads from the bodice were placed on the floorboards beneath. A brightly jewelled, delicate chrysalis of a bloodwood sap ball was placed on the wall above.

Spotlit and extended the ” Dress” occupied the gallery area filling the space successfully. Only two of the beads remained at the de-install. Were they collected

Dress
Dress

or had they attached themselves to the sole of a viewers shoe ?

Unfinished Search for the Miraculous

Five Walls Project Space
Five Walls Project Space

I am exhibiting in this collaborative show @five_walls titled “Unfinished Search for the Miraculous” . It is a curatorial project based around Dutch artist , Bas Van Ader’s life work, in which he pursued the concept of when is an artwork finished.

Lauren Kennedy
Lauren Kennedy
Mesh
Mesh

I collaborated with @m_wallus01 ,@pjbgoldehguro , @robert_mangion2705 , and Lauren Kennedy, to create an interactive exhibition embracing printing, photography, sound installation, artist book and abstract assemblage work.

It was a challenging exercise and taught me about working to a theme, collaborating with mentors, peers, and younger practitioners and expanding my skills. Five workers in the visual art field who resonated well in the five walls project space, it seemed appropriate somehow.

Waiting by Peter Burke
Waiting by Peter Burke

We installed the show, orchestrated the opening night and gallery sat. All valuable skills. The install taught me basic woodworking applications and trained me in spatial and location techniques. Opening night displayed the importance of networking and getting as many people as possible to your show. Gallery sitting became a valuable lesson in marketing the work, making it accessible to visitors and facilitating the experience by being able to talk about the work.

Marcel Felaille Sound Installation
Marcel Felaille Sound Installation

I am grateful for the opportunity and will be sad but feeling empowered when the exhibition ends on 7th October.

 

ebb and flow 2017 Banyule Award for Works on Paper

Jo Scicluna
Jo Scicluna

I saw this exhibition of 38 finalists work which delves into the myriad different ways that paper can be employed in making art. In 2017 the conceptual theme

winner Dianne Fogwell "1903 - the Grey Sea", artist's book
winner Dianne Fogwell “1903 – the Grey Sea”, artist’s book

for Banyule Council’s Arts and Culture Program is ‘water’. The award features a wide assortment of works on paper and various techniques of production. Extensive printmaking processes feature including linocut, screenprint, mezzotint, etching, intaglio, letterpress and woodblock. Other making techniques include drawing, painting,photography, digital prints, artist’s books, and paper sculptures.

Paul Kalemba
Paul Kalemba

 

Monash fellows Marion Crawford and Paul Kalemba

Franky Howell Untitled 2017
Franky Howell Untitled 2017

are featured the former with a printed artist book ” Picturing the Island “and the latter with a watercolour drawing.

Ten Cubed Exhibition at Glen Eira Town Hall Gallery, Caulfield

Starlight 2001 colour digital print
Starlight 2001
colour digital print

Ten Cubed Exhibition at Glen Eira Town Hall Gallery, Caulfield

 

Of particular interest where the photographers Pat Brassington and David Rosetzky

The former is a Tasmanian female photographer who is a powerful manipulator of imagery of the female figure which has been partially collaged with other images. Eg a woman walking across a pathway with a paper bag where her head should be.

 

David Rosetzky is a Melbourne based artist who works at Monash University, and also uses the human form of portraiture but lays into the face of the subject other contrasting images. An example would be the face of a young man with a dove flying across it. Well curated  , films /audios placed inside large cubicles for easy viewing and soundproofing and like items exhibited together. There was a diverse range of work but all referenced the human figure in some way.

Ronnie van Hout at Gertrude Contemporary Art Space

Ronnie van Hout at Gertrude Contemporary Art Space
Ronnie van Hout at Gertrude Contemporary Art Space

Ronnie Van Hout, Gertrude Contemporary Gallery, September 2016.

“You”, smaller than life size figure dressed in a onesie holding a microphone.

I attended a talk by Ronnie van Hout at MADA earlier in the year in May 2016.

I was intrigued to hear him talk about his creative practice and the work he does at MADA as I find him and his practice irreverent, fun and enjoyable. He puts the childish, high spirited and delightful playfulness into a serious artistic journey.

The front room exhibition space faces the street and has a large vista from the street and visibility for foot traffic, passers by in cars, and tram passengers. His diminutive figure is a self portrait or parody of the adult Ronnie dressed in a child’s batman onesie holding a microphone. The caption is YOU reinforced on a timber laser cutout board placed in a direct behind his head at the back of the front room.

His legs as placed in a spread eagled stance, one hand clutching a microphone, gaze directly ahead, a rather confrontational pose with the body protruding slightly forward. From distance the body looks childlike but is a grotesque self parody of the young Ronnie with the current older head. The hair is reddish hue, the eyes sea like blue, but steely. It implies a sense of fun with this small figure claiming attention by shouting YOU but its very presence in an obvious space. I laughed. It made me feel great. Its inviting you want to approach the figure and see why he is so angry, then you get a shock when you realise its an old persons face and mannerisms on a young person’s body.

The textile language is a strong piece of the work, in that the batman onesie reinforces the stereotype of what a juvenile might wear but the old head juxtaposes this young imagery.

Ronnie van Hout at Gertrude Contemporary Art Space
Ronnie van Hout at Gertrude Contemporary Art Space

Brilliantly executed the gallery space is a clever and appropriate placement for the work and attracts much attention and garners interest from passers-by. When I went a young woman who was caring for a child walked at the front of the gallery stopped, and exhorted the child to visit it as deserving of closer attention. A walk in and inspection incited her curiosity and and invited comment from the child. She talked to me about the work, asked the child her reaction and offered to take my photo with it. I believe the successful curation made the work engage more fully with the public and made this work address and achieve the desired purpose of the maker as signified by the title “YOU”. It was a bit of whimsical fun in a hectic, part of town and made scurrying city folk stop and embrace the work.